Dr. Ruth Ley is Managing Director of the Max Planck Institute for Biology Tübingen and Director of the Department of Microbiome Science. Dr. Sara Clasen is a postdoctoral fellow in the same lab. Together, they’re interested in the co-evolution of humans with their microbiomes. They use basic science to investigate the evolutionary history of gut microbes, how they have adapted to life inside humans, and how they affect human biology and health. More recently, they published a pre-print on the silent recognition of flagellins from human gut commensal bacteria by TLR5.
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Dr. Leonardo Ferreira is an Assistant Professor of Microbiology and Immunology at the Medical University of South Carolina. The Ferreira lab uses CARs and other engineered immune receptors to dissect how specificity, affinity, and signaling modulate the function of different T cells subsets in tolerance and immunity. He talks about how CAR Tregs could prevent transplant rejection and treat Type 1 diabetes. He also discusses mixing and matching immune cells, the freedom to pursue multiple ideas in academia, and science outreach in Bolivia
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Dr. Karen Edelblum is an Assistant Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School. She discusses γδ T cells and immune-epithelial cross-talk in inflammatory bowel disease. She also talks about intravital microscopy and decorating immunology-themed cakes!
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Dr. Jonathan Kipnis is the BJC Investigator and Alan A. and Edith L. Wolff Distinguished Professor of Pathology and Immunology at Washington University in St. Louis. His lab investigates the complex interactions between the immune and nervous systems. He talks about immune activity and surveillance in the brain, and how T cell subsets affect brain function and behavior. He also discusses the brain’s immune reservoir and his lab’s work on cerebrospinal fluid-regulated immune cell mobilization.
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Dr. Mark Kaplan is the Chair of the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at Indiana University School of Medicine. He is currently the Editor-In-Chief for the American Association of Immunologists’ journal ImmunoHorizons. Much of Dr. Kaplan’s work has focused on understanding the function of transcription factors in the development of T helper cell subsets. He talks about the role of T helper 9 cells in lung inflammation and γδ T cells in wound healing. He also discusses ImmunoHorizons and how it provides a home for solid immunological research that may otherwise remain unpublished.
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