Dr. Vijay Kuchroo is the Samuel L. Wasserstrom Professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School. His major research interests include the role of co-stimulation in autoimmune diseases, as well as cell surface molecules and regulatory factors that regulate the induction of T cell tolerance and dysfunction. He talks about the conditions necessary to differentiate Th17 cells and their role in autoimmunity. He also discusses his group’s discovery of Tim-3, an inhibitor receptor on T cells which is now being exploited for cancer immunotherapy.
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Dr. Leonardo Ferreira is an Assistant Professor of Microbiology and Immunology at the Medical University of South Carolina. The Ferreira lab uses CARs and other engineered immune receptors to dissect how specificity, affinity, and signaling modulate the function of different T cells subsets in tolerance and immunity. He talks about how CAR Tregs could prevent transplant rejection and treat Type 1 diabetes. He also discusses mixing and matching immune cells, the freedom to pursue multiple ideas in academia, and science outreach in Bolivia
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Dr. Laura Mackay is a Professor and Laboratory Head at the Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity at the University of Melbourne. She talks about her tissue-resident memory T cell research and her ongoing collaboration with Pfizer to identify and validate new targets for cancer therapy.
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Dr. Alice Long is an Associate Member of the Center for Translational Immunology at Benaroya Research Institute at Virginia Mason. The Long lab is focused on understanding how tolerance is lost in autoimmunity, specifically as it related to type 1 diabetes. Dr. Long discusses the work she presented at the American Association of Immunologists’ annual meeting, IMMUNOLOGY2022, on CD8 T cell exhaustion and Treg modulation.
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Dr. Michael Rosenblum is a Professor of Dermatology at the University of California, San Francisco. His lab seeks to to understand how immune responses are regulated in tissues and how this knowledge can be exploited for therapeutic benefit. They are currently investigating how Tregs control immune responses in tissues, as well as their “alternative” functions. He talks about early-life inflammation and type 2 helper T cells in the skin, and how Tregs can be manipulated to target autoimmune diseases and cancer.
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